The southeast region of the United States is not the only area affected by the opioid crisis. Recent news shows that California has taken a particularly large hit from the drug that has spawned a nationwide epidemic since 2010. Many may wonder what constitutes as a prescription drug or heroin possession charge, and what that charge might mean for their future. While the consequences of a heroin possession offense can be severe, a new drug called Naloxone has changed the outlook for this epidemic.

OC Weekly pointed out last July that Orange County ranked third in California for counties with the highest drug overdose deaths between 2013 and 2015, with Huntington Beach leading in overdoses. However, law enforcement in the area do not consider Huntington to be in a state of opioid crisis. Health experts state otherwise, claiming that many OC residents assume that only a certain demographic uses opioids. Despite popular belief, cases have arisen out of every racial group, social status and financial state, but treatment centers emphasize the importance of preventative care. Other health experts claim that doctors simply do not give enough attention to teenage patients, who then turn to cheaper but harder alternatives that can have costly consequences.

To dovetail from OC Weekly’s report on the unacknowledged opioid crisis in the area, The Orange County Register also comments on the seriousness of this problem. The OC Register states that teens, young adults and even baby boomers first become addicted to pain medication, and then move on to heroin. Yet a new drug called Naloxone has potential of saving thousands of lives. Naloxone reverses the effects of an overdose by reviving an individual back to life. Many users who complete rehab only to use again are among those who are at the highest risk of overdosing. And while Naloxone (also called Narcan) is currently of limited availability, California recovery organizations hope to make the life-saving drug readily available in the coming months.