As a California resident facing a white-collar criminal charge, you may have justifiable concerns about the penalties you could potentially face should you be convicted. While financial crimes can lead to considerable consequences that may include steep fines, professional repercussions and possible jail time, they can also affect your professional standing, meaning they may ultimately cost you your entire career and professional reputation.

Certain financial crimes, per the California Department of Justice’s Office of the Attorney General, such as those committed against the elderly or dependent or disabled adults, have clearly defined penalties associated with them as defined under California Penal Code 368. These penalties will typically differ based on whether you had a caretaker role over the victim of the crime.

Financial criminal penalties for non-caretakers

If you were not a caretaker over a particular individual, but you violated some section of the law pertaining to theft or embezzlement and knew the victim was an elder or dependent adult, you can anticipate steep penalties. In situations where the property taken from the senior citizen had a value of more than $950, you can expect to have to pay a $1,000 fine, and you can also expect to spend either a year in county jail or, in some cases, up to four years in a state prison. In situations where property taken is worth less than $950, you can anticipate paying a $1,000 fine and spending a year in county jail, if convicted.

Financial criminal penalties for caretakers

If it is proved that you had a caretaker role over a victim before convicting you, you will typically face the same penalties outlined above. However, you will also be guilty of either a felony or misdemeanor, depending on the details surrounding your offense.

Financial crimes can bring with them substantial consequences. If you are facing white collar criminal charges, intervening early may help reduce the damage your charges do to your life.